ASCL Prizes

Hessel Yntema Prize

Established in 1991 to honor the first editor in chief of the American Journal of Comparative Law, the Hessel Yntema prize of $1,500 recognizes the “most outstanding” article by a younger scholar under 40 years of age published in a recent volume of the Journal.

Prize Winners:

  • 2020: Michelle Miao “Defining Death-Eligible Murder in China”, 67 Am. J. Comp. L. 327-382 (2019).
  • 2019: Jaakko Salminen, “The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh”, 66 Am. J. Comp. L. 411-451 (2018)
  • 2018: James G. Stewart & Asad Kiyani, “The Ahistoricism of Legal Pluralism in International Criminal Law” 65 Am. J. Comp. L. 393-449 (2017)
  • 2017: Maya Berinzon & Ryan C. Briggs,  “Legal Families Without the Laws: The Fading of Colonial Law in French West Africa”, 64 Am. J. Comp. L. 329-370 (2016)
  • 2016: Philomila Tsoukala, “Household Regulation and European Integration: The Family Portrait of a Crisis”, 63 Am. J. Comp. L. 747-800 (2015)
  • 2016: Yan Lin, “Constitutional Interpretation in Lawmaking: China’s Invisible Constitutional Enforcement Mechanism”, 63 Am. J. Comp. L. 467-492 (2015)
  • 2015: Mathilde Cohen, “Ex Ante Versus Ex Post Deliberations: Two Models of Judicial Deliberations in Courts of Last Resort”  62 Am. J. Comp. L.  951-1008 (2014)
  • 2013: Mariana Pargendler, “Politics in the Origins: The Making of Corporate Law in Nineteenth Century Brazil,” 60 Am. J. Comp. L. 805 (2012).
  • 2012: Andreas Abegg, “The Evolution of the Contracting State and Its Courts,” 59 Am. J. Comp. L. 611 (2011).
  • 2011: Amalia D. Kessler, Lewis Talbot and Nadine Hearn Shelton, Professor of International Legal Studies, & Professor (by courtesy) of History Stanford Law School. “Marginalization and Myths: The corporatist Roots of France’s Forgotten, Elective Judiciary” 58 Am. J. Comp. L. 679 (2010).
  • 2010: Richard Albert, “The Fusion of Presidentialism and Parliamentarism,” 57 Am. J. Comp. L. 531 (2009).
  • 2009: Haider Ala Hamoudi, “The Muezzin’s Call and the Dow Jones Bell: On the Necessity of Realism in the Study of Islamic Law” 56 Am. J. Comp. L.423 (2008).
  • 2008: Ron Scalise, “Why No ‘Efficient Breach’ in the Civil Law?: A Comparative Assessment of the Doctrine of Efficient Breach of Contract” 55 Am. J. Comp. L. 721 (2007).
  • 2007: Maximo Langer, “The Rise of Managerial Judging in International Criminal Law,” 53 Am. J. Comp. L. 853-910 (2005).·     
  • 2006: Aditi Bagchi, “The Political Economy of Merger Regulation,” 53 Am. J. Comp. L. 1-30 (2005).
  • 2005: Zdenĕk Kühn, “Worlds Apart: Western and Central European Judicial Culture at the Onset of the European Enlargement,” 52 Am. J. Comp. L. 531-67 (2004).
  • 2004: Mark D. West & Emily M. Morris, “The Tragedy of the Condominiums: Legal Responses to Collective Action Problems After the Kobe Earthquake,” 51 Am. J. Comp. L. 903-40 (2003).
  • 2003: Katharina Pistor, “The Standardization of Law and Its Effect on Developing Economies,” 50 Am. J. Comp. L. 97-130 (2002).
  • 2002: Tom Ginsburg, “Dismantling the ‘Developmental State’?: Administrative Procedure Reform in Japan and Korea,” 49 Am. J. Comp. L. 585-625 (2001).
  • 2001: Elisabetta Grande, “Italian Criminal Justice: Borrowing and Resistance,” 48 Am. J. Comp. L. 227-59 (2000).
  • 2000: Jeremy Sarkin, “The Drafting of South Africa’s Final Constitution from a Human-Rights Perspective,” 47 Am. J. Comp. L. 67-87 (1999).Stuart Dutson, “Product Liability and Private International Law: Choice of Law in Tort in England,” 47 Am. J. Comp. L. 129-46 (1999).
  • 1996: Steve J. Boom, “The European Union after the Maastricht Decision: Will Germany Be the ‘Virginia of Europe’?,” 43 Am. J. Comp. L. 177-226 (1995).
  • 1995: Jonathan E. Levitski, “The Europeanization of British Legal Style,” 42 Am. J. Comp. L. 347-80 (1994).·      1992: Martin Boodman, “The Myth of Harmonization of Laws,” 39 Am. J. Comp. L. 699-724 (1991).